Some works from Two Times Elliott’s anniversary show. Interpretations of the number 22.

Designers (top to bottom): Bänziger Hug; Dn&Co; Heydays.

Malin Rosenqvist.

Malin Rosenqvist.

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jilliantamaki / Jillian Tamaki:

Selected images from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas, by Jules Verne. Published by the Folio Society. You can buy it here.

One of the best part of being an illustrator, in my humble opinion, is reading books that you might not have otherwise. Given the modern-day representations, I think I was expecting some sort of pulpy adventure story (quite an anachronistic notion, given the book was written in 1869). In reality, it’s a scientific travelogue: very thoroughly observed and researched. There are also some very beautiful descriptions of foreign lands that, when you think about it, are no closer to most of us now than they were in 1869.

__

Other Folio Society books I have illustrated:

Goblin Market and Selected Poems - Christina Rosetti

Irish Myths and Legends - Lady Gregory

Source: jilliantamaki

Collages by Alexis Anne Mackenzie.

design-is-fine:

Aspen Magazine, 1965-1971. The cult magazine of the Sixties. New York. Via pbagalleries. Docu of the complete edition here

Aspen was the first three-dimensional magazine. "In calling it a ‘magazine,’ we are harking back to the original meaning of the word as ‘a storehouse, a cache, a ship laden with stores." Under the leadership of Phyllis Johnson it was loaded with flexi vinyls, a Super 8 film, books, posters, cards and more. Each issue had a different theme and editor, many artists worked for the Aspen editorial, like Warhol, Sontag, Cage. More on Video: Whitechapel Gallery

Source: whitechapelgallery.org

monicatramos / Monica Ramos:

[ river / lake / spring ] paintings from the group show Just Swim ! 
available for purchase: info@artrebels.com

Source: monicatramos

dadushin / Dadu Shin:

A small comic I did for the NYT Private Lives blog. This is the probably the first comic I’ve done since I was 5 years old and I’m happy I got to do it for something close to my heart. Many thanks to my AD Sarah Williamson at the Times.

dadushin / Dadu Shin:

A small comic I did for the NYT Private Lives blog. This is the probably the first comic I’ve done since I was 5 years old and I’m happy I got to do it for something close to my heart. Many thanks to my AD Sarah Williamson at the Times.

View in high-resolution

Source: dadushin

beouija / Eleanor Davis:

Orlando

beouija / Eleanor Davis:

Orlando

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Source: beouija

Yumi Sakugawa.

Yumi Sakugawa.

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vizual-statistix:

Unlike like Emperor Kuzco, I was actually born with an innate sense of direction.  If you’re like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you’ll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.
To generate the graphic, I first calculated the azimuth of every road in ten counties (plus one parish and D.C.). I tried to choose consolidated city-counties to keep the focus on urban centers, but for larger counties, I opted not to clip the shapefile to the city boundary. All calculations were made in a sinusoidal map projection using the central longitude of the area of interest. I then graphed the angles on rose diagrams (wind roses) using bins of 5° to show relative distributions for each area. The plots were scaled such that the maximum bar height was the same on each rose. To ensure rotational symmetry in the plots, each azimuth was counted twice: once using the original value and once using the opposite direction (e.g., 35° and 215°). As such, all streets, regardless of one-way or two-way traffic, were considered to be pointing in both directions.
The plots reveal some stark trends. Most of the counties considered do conform to a grid pattern. This is particularly pronounced with Chicago, even though much of Cook County is suburban. Denver, Jacksonville, Houston, and Washington, D.C., also have dominant grid patterns that are oriented in the cardinal directions. While Philadelphia and New York are primarily gridded, their orientations are slightly skewed from the traditional N-E-S-W bearings. Manhattan is particularly interesting because it has a notable imbalance between the number of streets running the width of the land (WNW to ESE) and the length of the land (NNE to SSW). New Orleans and San Francisco express some grid-like forms, but have a nontrivial proportion of roads that are rotated in other directions. Downtown Boston has some gridded streets, but the suburban grids are differently aligned, dampening the expression of a single grid on the rose diagram. Finally, the minimal geographic extents of the grids in Charlotte and Honolulu are completely overwhelmed by the winding roads of the suburbs, resulting in plots that show only slight favoritism for certain street orientations.
If you want to see more detail, a full-resolution version of this graphic can be downloaded here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/my7y24hrzvhagce/Road_Orientation.png
Data source: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2013/main
Script for azimuth calculation: http://www.ian-ko.com/free/free_arcgis.htm

vizual-statistix:

Unlike like Emperor Kuzco, I was actually born with an innate sense of direction.  If you’re like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you’ll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.

To generate the graphic, I first calculated the azimuth of every road in ten counties (plus one parish and D.C.). I tried to choose consolidated city-counties to keep the focus on urban centers, but for larger counties, I opted not to clip the shapefile to the city boundary. All calculations were made in a sinusoidal map projection using the central longitude of the area of interest. I then graphed the angles on rose diagrams (wind roses) using bins of 5° to show relative distributions for each area. The plots were scaled such that the maximum bar height was the same on each rose. To ensure rotational symmetry in the plots, each azimuth was counted twice: once using the original value and once using the opposite direction (e.g., 35° and 215°). As such, all streets, regardless of one-way or two-way traffic, were considered to be pointing in both directions.

The plots reveal some stark trends. Most of the counties considered do conform to a grid pattern. This is particularly pronounced with Chicago, even though much of Cook County is suburban. Denver, Jacksonville, Houston, and Washington, D.C., also have dominant grid patterns that are oriented in the cardinal directions. While Philadelphia and New York are primarily gridded, their orientations are slightly skewed from the traditional N-E-S-W bearings. Manhattan is particularly interesting because it has a notable imbalance between the number of streets running the width of the land (WNW to ESE) and the length of the land (NNE to SSW). New Orleans and San Francisco express some grid-like forms, but have a nontrivial proportion of roads that are rotated in other directions. Downtown Boston has some gridded streets, but the suburban grids are differently aligned, dampening the expression of a single grid on the rose diagram. Finally, the minimal geographic extents of the grids in Charlotte and Honolulu are completely overwhelmed by the winding roads of the suburbs, resulting in plots that show only slight favoritism for certain street orientations.

If you want to see more detail, a full-resolution version of this graphic can be downloaded here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/my7y24hrzvhagce/Road_Orientation.png

Data source: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2013/main

Script for azimuth calculation: http://www.ian-ko.com/free/free_arcgis.htm

View in high-resolution

Source: vizual-statistix

design-is-fine:

Female Figure of the Kilia Type, Chalcolithic, 2800 - 2200 B.C., Marble, unknown artist. Anatolia, Turkey.

design-is-fine:

Female Figure of the Kilia Type, Chalcolithic, 2800 - 2200 B.C., Marble, unknown artist. Anatolia, Turkey.

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Source: search.getty.edu

Works from Andrew Hem's 2012 show at Gallery Nucleus and one (bottom) from his upcoming show at Merry Karnowsky Gallery.

monicatramos / Monica Ramos:

This the illustration that I did for Grave Danger, a report on the sustainable death movement… un-cropped and un-white spaced! You can see a page of the magazine article here and read everything here. ✿

monicatramos / Monica Ramos:

This the illustration that I did for Grave Danger, a report on the sustainable death movement… un-cropped and un-white spaced! You can see a page of the magazine article here and read everything here

View in high-resolution

Source: monicatramos

monicatramos / Monica Ramos:

I made this illustration for a breakdown of the novel The Mango Bride in Issue 4 of the Manila Review. It’s a novel about family, social class, migration and Philippine society. You can read the complete review here.
Thanks to the wonderful Kristian Henson!

monicatramos / Monica Ramos:

I made this illustration for a breakdown of the novel The Mango Bride in Issue 4 of the Manila Review. It’s a novel about family, social class, migration and Philippine society. You can read the complete review here.

Thanks to the wonderful Kristian Henson!

Source: monicatramos

design-is-fine:

Erik Nitsche, design for book binding of the series New illustrated library of science and invention, 1963. Source

(via 50watts)

Source: Flickr / nevolution